Cannabis

Beaumont's approach to cannabis legalization

On September 25, 2018, Beaumont Town Council approved the Cannabis Consumption Bylaw (Bylaw 929-18), which regulates the consumption of cannabis within the Town of Beaumont. This bylaw came into effect on October 17, 2018. The minimum age for purchase and consumption in Alberta will be 18 years old.


  • Consuming Cannabis(smoking or vaping) in any public place in Beaumont is prohibited. Beaumont will not regulate cannabis use on private property.
  • If you live in a condo or apartment, condo boards and landlords may set regulations.
  • Medicinal cannabis users cannot smoke, vape or consume cannabis in any Designated Public Places as described by the Smoke-Free Public Places Bylaw 593-03.
  • Medicinal cannabis users must, on demand of a Peace Officer, produce a copy of the person’s medical document if consuming Cannabis in public.
  • 30 grams is the most anyone can buy or carry at a time. A minor under the age of 18 cannot enter cannabis stores, even with an adult.
  • Each household can only grow 4 plants.
  • Driving high is illegal and cannabis cannot be within reach of anyone in a vehicle.
  • The fine for smoking, vaping or consuming cannabis in a public place and eating or consuming edible cannabis product in a public place within Beaumont is $250.00.


What is cannabis?

Cannabis refers to products made from the leaves, flowers and resins of the cannabis plant. Other names for cannabis include marijuana or pot. Cannabis users smoke, vaporize, or add cannabis to food or drinks.

Today, it is only legal to use cannabis with a medical prescription. The Government of Canada’s plans to legalize cannabis in 2018, and will allow cannabis to be used for recreational purposes.


Cannabis - Public Consumption Survey


On April 13, 2017, the Government of Canada introduced legislation to legalize, regulate and restrict access to Cannabis (Bill C-45) and on June 19, 2018, the Senate passed Bill C-45 paving the way to legalize Cannabis.. As of October 17, 2018 the sale, distribution and consumption of Cannabis will be allowed in Canada.

Federal legislation provides laws for controlling the production, distribution, sale and possession of cannabis across Canada ((Cannabis Act(External link)). The Government of Alberta subsequently established its own Act and Regulation in response to the Federal Cannabis Framework. The Provincial Act to Control and Regulate Cannabis (Bill-26) provides the framework for the sale and distribution of cannabis as well as the regulations for consumption (Government of Alberta: Alberta Cannabis Framework and Legislation(External link)) in Alberta.

Municipalities across Alberta have been delegated the opportunity of incorporating control measures into bylaws regulating the consumption of Cannabis.


We gathered feedback on the public consumption of Cannabis in Beaumont to inform the development of a public Cannabis consumption bylaw in our community here are the results.





Beaumont's approach to cannabis legalization

On September 25, 2018, Beaumont Town Council approved the Cannabis Consumption Bylaw (Bylaw 929-18), which regulates the consumption of cannabis within the Town of Beaumont. This bylaw came into effect on October 17, 2018. The minimum age for purchase and consumption in Alberta will be 18 years old.


  • Consuming Cannabis(smoking or vaping) in any public place in Beaumont is prohibited. Beaumont will not regulate cannabis use on private property.
  • If you live in a condo or apartment, condo boards and landlords may set regulations.
  • Medicinal cannabis users cannot smoke, vape or consume cannabis in any Designated Public Places as described by the Smoke-Free Public Places Bylaw 593-03.
  • Medicinal cannabis users must, on demand of a Peace Officer, produce a copy of the person’s medical document if consuming Cannabis in public.
  • 30 grams is the most anyone can buy or carry at a time. A minor under the age of 18 cannot enter cannabis stores, even with an adult.
  • Each household can only grow 4 plants.
  • Driving high is illegal and cannabis cannot be within reach of anyone in a vehicle.
  • The fine for smoking, vaping or consuming cannabis in a public place and eating or consuming edible cannabis product in a public place within Beaumont is $250.00.


What is cannabis?

Cannabis refers to products made from the leaves, flowers and resins of the cannabis plant. Other names for cannabis include marijuana or pot. Cannabis users smoke, vaporize, or add cannabis to food or drinks.

Today, it is only legal to use cannabis with a medical prescription. The Government of Canada’s plans to legalize cannabis in 2018, and will allow cannabis to be used for recreational purposes.


Cannabis - Public Consumption Survey


On April 13, 2017, the Government of Canada introduced legislation to legalize, regulate and restrict access to Cannabis (Bill C-45) and on June 19, 2018, the Senate passed Bill C-45 paving the way to legalize Cannabis.. As of October 17, 2018 the sale, distribution and consumption of Cannabis will be allowed in Canada.

Federal legislation provides laws for controlling the production, distribution, sale and possession of cannabis across Canada ((Cannabis Act(External link)). The Government of Alberta subsequently established its own Act and Regulation in response to the Federal Cannabis Framework. The Provincial Act to Control and Regulate Cannabis (Bill-26) provides the framework for the sale and distribution of cannabis as well as the regulations for consumption (Government of Alberta: Alberta Cannabis Framework and Legislation(External link)) in Alberta.

Municipalities across Alberta have been delegated the opportunity of incorporating control measures into bylaws regulating the consumption of Cannabis.


We gathered feedback on the public consumption of Cannabis in Beaumont to inform the development of a public Cannabis consumption bylaw in our community here are the results.





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Cannabis is a plant, how can a plant be illegal?. It is what the person does that affects community, like alcohol and tobacoo.

nanyayahan 3 months ago

Cannabis is a drug, just as alcohol is a drug. Both drugs change the abilities and perception of the person using them. Cannabis when smoked has a direct affect on people nearby, in terms of second and third hand smoke. For years we have worked on controlling the effects of cigarette smoke to the advantage of non smokers and smokers as well. Health results are visible as a result of this!
Treat cannabis as a drug, to be used medically and recreationally in ones home so that the general population of non users ie children, people with respiratory problems and the general population that want to breathe clean air are protected. CANNABIS IS A DRUG THAT HAS NOT BEEN RESEARCHED ADEQUATELY! KEEP BEAUMONT SAFE AND HEALTHY!

Lorraine McAuley 4 months ago

Cannabis and tobacco smoking use should be combined in one bylaw. Side stream nuisance smoke needs to be illegal as it causes cancer for non-smoking individuals. Baked Cannabis goods may be ingested where adults congregate without children.

Paul Pomerleau 5 months ago

I would like a bylaw that is simple and clear to understand, that maintains what exists in our present smoking bylaw, and that it be modified and improved to include marijuana smoke. Actually, the bylaw should included vaping, for both tobacco and marijuana.

I agree with Jason McNabb, I would like the bylaw to protect residents from unreasonable odour from neighbouring homes. It needs to be enforcable. Even before legalization a number of residents are being expected to put up with this, and this is unacceptable. When I read the health concerns listed by AHS, it gives added reason to why residents should be allowed to breath clean air on their own property. Marijuana smoke is the worst of the culprits that contaminate what we breath.

The bylaw should absolutely follow the recommendations of Alberta Health Services (AHS) regarding consumption, especially because we are a close-knit community with many children, of all ages:

"Consumption
AHS recommends that municipalities align their regulations with the Tobacco and Smoking Reduction Act. In addition, municipalities may also want to consider enacting bylaws that consider banning tobacco-like substances such as shisha.

AHS recommends that municipalities implement regulations banning consumption in public places, as well as for public intoxication (see Alberta Liquor and Gaming Act). The rationale for this is two-fold: (i) cannabis is an intoxicating substance and should therefore be treated similarly to alcohol, and (ii) harms related to second and third-hand smoke, especially for children and youth. Second-hand cannabis smoke is more mutagenic and cytotoxic than tobacco smoke, and therefore second-hand inhalation of cannabis should be considered a health risk (Cone et al., 2011; Health Technology Assessment Unit, 2017; Maertens, White, Williams & Yauk, 2013).

Special attention should be directed at banning consumption in areas frequented by children, including: all types of parks (provincial, municipal, athletic parks, baseball, urban, trails/pathways, etc.), playgrounds, school grounds, community centers, sports fields, queues, skateboard parks, amphitheaters, picnic areas and crowded outdoor events where children are present (i.e., all ages music festivals, CFL football games, rodeos, parades, Canada Day celebrations, outdoor festivals, outdoor amusement parks (private), golf courses, zoos, transit and school bus stops, ski hills, outdoor skating rinks or on any municipal owned lands) (Rethinking Access to Marijuana, 2017). Public consumption bans should also be enacted for hospitals (all points of health care, urgent care clinics, clinics, etc.), picnic areas (alcohol limits for outdoor consumption). Currently, consumption of tobacco and tobacco-like products is not permitted on any AHS property."

In conclusion, I insist there should not be any cannabis retail store in the Centre-ville part of town, as there are two schools and several public facilities frequented by kids. I believe in the 300 meter example. AHS recommends:

Location and Number of Stores
Alberta Health Services recommends municipalities strengthen zoning regulations by using a combination of population and geographic based formulas to restrict the number and location of cannabis outlet licenses. In particular AHS recommends that municipalities:
 Limit the number of business licenses issued in the first phases of implementation.
 Implement a 300-500m minimum distance restriction between cannabis retail outlets
 Implement a 300m distance between cannabis stores and schools, daycares and community centers.
 Implement a 100m minimum distance from tobacco and liquor retailers, in addition to a square
kilometer density restriction, adjusted for population, at the onset of legalization.
 Note: additional analysis may be needed to ensure that unintended consequences do not negatively
impact existing communities (e.g., clustering, social and health harms, vulnerable populations).

Carole Hudson 5 months ago

Is there a plan for a bylaw that restricts where cannabis can be used? I would propose that for cannabis usage where it's a form that you smoke that we consider a cumulative approach of the existing smoking and alcohol bylaws. I'm also hoping there will be bylaw that can be enforced enforcement to protect residents who endure an unreasonable odor from neighboring homes.

Jason McNabb 5 months ago